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Space Integration, Not Separation: Aerospace Power for the Future

The Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies is pleased to announce the release of its entry in The Mitchell Forum paper series, “Space Integration, Not Separation: Aerospace Power for the Future,” by Col Bill Bruner, USAF (Ret.). With Congress and the Department of Defense now discussing the merits of a proposed “US Space Force,” Bruner takes a close look at the doctrinal and organizational issues involved with military spacepower, and argues that closer integration of spacepower with the US Air Force will lead to better outcomes in 21st century warfare. Bruner, the current CEO of California-based New Frontier Aerospace, a former assistant administrator at NASA, and a veteran Air Force weap

Data Requirements and Rights: Time for a Reassessment

The Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies is pleased to announce the latest installment in its Mitchell Institute Policy Papers series, “Data Requirements and Rights: Time for a Reassessment,” by Senior Visiting Fellow Col Herbert C. Kemp, USAF (Ret.), PhD, with Mitchell’s Director of Research Maj Gen Lawrence Stutzriem, USAF (Ret.), and Mitchell Senior Fellow Heather Penney. This latest policy paper takes a look at a problem bubbling beneath the surface of many of the Air Force’s leading acquisition programs—namely, data requirements and rights. Unlike the development of weapon systems in the 20th century, today’s military hardware is highly dependent on information age technology. Howev

Manned-Unmanned Aircraft Teaming: Taking Combat Airpower to the Next Level

The Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies is pleased to announce the latest installment in its Mitchell Institute Policy Papers series, “Manned-Unmanned Aircraft Teaming: Taking Combat Airpower to the Next Level,” by Mitchell’s Executive Director Douglas Birkey, Dean, Lt Gen David Deptula, USAF (Ret.), and Director of Research Maj Gen Lawrence Stutzriem, USAF (Ret.). This latest policy paper examines the problem the US Air Force faces in addressing the current capacity gaps—particularly with its bomber and fighter force. The paper notes that as a result of advancements in autonomy, processing power, and collaborative information exchange, the US Air Force may soon be able to fly tradition

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